Addison’s Walk

Recently my husband and I had the privilege of visiting Oxford. Ever since I read C.S. Lewis’s account of his memorable walk with his friends JRR Tolkien and Hugo Dyson, I wanted to visit Addison’s walk myself. Walking where two of my favorite authors discussed faith and myth made a dream come true. Continue reading Addison’s Walk

From Plato to the Trinity

In Plato’s dialogue Euthyphro, two characters discuss the nature of the divine. While Euthyphro considers himself an expert in pious living, Socrates dismantles his arguments. In so doing, he not only shows that Greek polytheism is internally inconsistent, but the logical extension of this reasoning gives multiple insights into the identity of God or gods, endorsing and discrediting various religious tenets. We find that the Trinity, perhaps uniquely, remains viable in the face of Socrates scrutiny.
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Why Peeves?

Let’s face it, as good as JK is, Peeves just isn’t that funny. If he had been in the movies, he might have stirred up a Jar Jar level of hatred, though that’s a tall order. So why include him in the books? On the surface it seems like comic relief, but all the scenes with Peeves essentially recycle the same jokes over and over and over and over for seven books.
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